TR-35 Award Winners

MIT’s Technology Review annually names 35 innovators under the age of 35 to be recipients of their coveted TR35 awards, given to young technologists who are “tackling important problems in transformative ways.” Past recipients of this award, now in its 11th year, include CSE Professors Yoshi Kohno (2007) and Shwetak Patel (2009).

The UW Computer Science Engineering department is extremely proud of six recent Ph.D. graduates, each profiled here, who have also won TR35 Awards. Check out their websites for more information on the important and interesting work they continue to do. CSE is honored to have played a role in teaching and mentoring these young scholars.

image of Noah Snavely

Noah Snavely, 2011 TR35 Winner. Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. Noah’s research interests are in computer vision and computer graphics, and in particular recovering 3D structure from large community photo collections for use in graphics and visualization. His thesis work on “virtual tourism” became the basis of Microsoft’s PhotoSynth system. Noah received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in December 2008. Thesis: "Scene Reconstruction and Visualization from Internet Photo Collections.” Advisors: Steve Seitz, Rick Szeliski (Affiliate Faculty, Microsoft Research).

 
image of Scott Saponas

T. Scott Saponas, 2010 TR35 Winner. Researcher in the Computational User Experiences group at Microsoft Research. Scott’s research interests are Human Computer Interaction and Ubiquitous Computing. Scott received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in Spring 2010. Thesis: “Supporting Everyday Activities through Always Available Mobile Computing.” Advisors: James Landay, Desney Tan (Affiliate Faculty, Microsoft Research).

 
image of Jeff Bigham

Jeff Bigham, 2009 TR35 Winner. Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Rochester. Jeff’s work focuses on improving access to computing for people with disabilities or medical issues. He is the creator of VizWiz, an iPhone application that lets blind users take a picture, speak a question, and receive answers quickly from the crowd (i.e., usually in less than 30 seconds). Jeff received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2009. Thesis: “Intelligent Interfaces Enabling Blind Web Users to Build Accessibility into the Web.” Advisors: Richard E. Ladner, Ed Lazowska, Jacob O. Wobbrock (Adjunct Faculty, UW iSchool), Tessa Lau (IBM Research).

 
image of Adrien Treuille

Adrien Treuille, 2009 TR35 Winner. Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University. Adrien works in computer graphics and is one of the creators of Foldit, a computer game where users contribute to science by folding proteins. He also does research in the simulation and animation of very high-dimensional nonlinear phenomena (e.g., animal morphology, human motion and large fluid systems). Adrien received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in May 2008. Thesis: “Low-dimensional Representations for the Simulation and Control of Complex Dynamics.” Advisors: Zoran Popović, Dieter Fox, Steven M. Seitz.

 
image of Karen Liu

C. Karen Liu, 2007 TR35 Winner. Assistant Professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech. Karen’s research interests are in computer graphics and animation, including physics-based animation, character animation, numerical methods, robotics and computational biomechanics. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2005. Thesis: “Towards a Generative Model of Natural Motion.” Advisors: Zoran Popović, Steven M. Seitz, Michael Cohen (Affiliate Faculty, Microsoft Research).

 
image of Tapan Parikh

Tapan Parikh, 2007 TR35 Winner and Humanitarian of the Year. Assistant Professor at the UC Berkley School of Information. Tapan’s research focuses on the use of computing to support sustainable economic development across the world. Specific topics of interest include human-computer interaction, mobile computing and information systems that support microfinance, smallholder agriculture and global health. Tapan received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2007. Thesis: “Designing an Architecture for Delivering Mobile Information Services to the Rural Developing World.” Advisors: Ed Lazowska, David Notkin, Gaetano Borriello, James Landay.