Agents'99 Invited Speakers

The organisers of Agents'99 are excited to announce that the conference features an exceptional array of invited speakers, representing the world's leading industrial and academic players in the agents arena, providing first-hand insights into their current work and painting their picture of  the future of agent technology.

The Invited Speakers at Agents'99 are:
 
Time Speaker Title
Monday 
May 3, 1999 
09:00 - 10:00 a.m. 
Michael Mauldin
Virtual Personalities Inc. & Lycos, Inc.
VERBOTS: Putting a face on natural language
Monday 
May 3, 1999 
17:45 - 18:45 
Wolfgang Wahlster
German Artificial Intelligence Research Center Ltd. (DFKI)
Personalized Interface Agents for Virtual Webpages
Tuesday 
May 4, 1999 
08:30 - 09:30 a.m. 
Brian Williams
M.I.T.
Model-based Autonomous Systems in Deep Space 
Tuesday 
May 4, 1999 
approx. 19:00 
Bill Joy
Sun Microsystems
Java and JINI: Toward a Network of Objects and Agents
Wednesday 
May 5, 1999 
09:00 - 10:00 a.m. 
Daniel T. Ling
Microsoft Research
Agents: Brains, Faces and Bodies
Wednesday 
May 5, 1999 
15:30 - 17:00 
Graham Glass
ObjectSpace
Agents and Internet Component Technology

Please click on the hyperlinks to see a short bio of the respective speaker.


Graham Glass

Chairman, Chief Technology Officer, and Co-Founder
ObjectSpace

Mr. Glass is the principal architect of the company's acclaimed solutions including the ObjectSpace Voyager distributed computing platform, JGL - The Generic Collection Library for Java, and C++ Component Series. Most recently, Mr. Glass spearheaded development of Voyager Professional Edition and its many breakthroughs for ease of use, performance and advanced capabilities. Two books authored by Mr. Glass - UNIX for Programmers and Users: A Complete Guide and The STL Primer - are used by many universities including Stanford and the University of New York. He also initiated the curriculum for object technology at the University of Texas at Dallas. Mr. Glass graduated with honors from the University of Southampton, England, where he received the British Computer Society award for the most distinguished undergraduate student. He graduated magna cum laude from the University of Texas at Dallas earning a master's degree in Computer Science. Mr. Glass is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Texas at Dallas.


Bill Joy

Chief Scientist and Corporate Executive Officer
Sun Microsystems

Bill Joy is a co-founder, the Chief Scientist at Sun Microsystems and a part of Sun's Executive Committee. During the last two years he has led design investigations for the architecture of UltraSparc IV, driven the business and technical strategy for Java, co-designed the picoJava, microJava and the ultraJava processor architectures, co-authored the specification for the Java Programming Language, and co-designed the lexical scoping and reflection APIs for Java version 1.1. His most recent work is on Jini technology for networking computer devices using Java.

He is currently researching new architectures for human-computer interaction, involving new kinds of interfaces, system and application software architectures and ways of storing information.

Bill Joy joined Sun from U.C. Berkeley where he was the author of Berkeley UNIX (BSD). Since joining Sun, he has led Sun's technical strategy, designing Sun's NFS Network File System and the SPARC Architecture. In 1991 he did the basic pipeline design of Ultrasparc-I and its multimedia processing features.

Bill was appointed by President Clinton as Co-Chairman of the Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee. The Advisory Committee is providing guidance and advice on all areas of high-performance computing, communications and information technologies to accelerate development and adoption of information technologies that will be vital for American prosperity in the twenty-first century.

Joy holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from U.C. Berkeley. He holds a Lifetime Achievement Award from the USENIX Association and the Grace Murray Hopper Award from the Association for Computing Machinery.


Daniel T. Ling

Director of Research
Microsoft

Daniel Ling is Director of Research at Microsoft, responsible for the Redmond laboratory. Microsoft Research is dedicated to pursuing long term research into a wide range of topics in computer science that we believe will transform computing over the next decade. The laboratory has established a tradition of working closely with the product and service groups at Microsoft while also participating actively in the worldwide research community. Dan joined Microsoft in early 1992 as one of the founders of the laboratory.

Previously, Dan was a senior manager at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. He initially worked on special purpose VLSI chips for displays and was a co-inventor of the video-RAM dynamic memory. Later he managed a number of departments working in the areas of advanced microsystems based on 370 and RISC architectures, as well as work on virtual worlds technology, user interfaces, and data visualization. One of the microsystems projects led to the IBM RS/6000 workstations.

Dan holds a B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

Agents: Brains, Faces and Bodies

Software entities that can act autonomously in a dynamic environment, learn, react and communicate with other agents will dramatically simplify many tasks for users. Agents are already finding their way into the user interface, providing context sensitive help, playing roles in computer games and entertainment, negotiating e-commerce, and used to simplify search and information discovery. I will describe some of our work in creating different aspects of agents, including their brains (the ability to learn and adapt), and their embodiment (faces and bodies). I also will discuss a fundamental change in metaphor that agents will bring to computers. Traditionally computers have been tools and their interface has been designed and evaluated based on that characterization. Agents change the computer from a tool to an assistant. I believe the implications of this are profound and not yet well understood.


Michael Mauldin

Chief Scientist
Lycos, Inc.

Managing Director
Virtual Personalities, Inc.

Dr. Michael L. Mauldin is adjunct research computer scientist at the Language Technologies Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon in 1989, and his M.S. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon in 1983. He received his B.A. in Mathematical Science and Computer Science from Rice University in 1981. He has authored 2 books, 10 refereed papers, and several technical reports on natural language, autonomous information agents, information retrieval and expert systems.

Dr. Mauldin is Managing Director of Virtual Personalities, Inc., a Beverly Hills company developing photo-realistic talking heads for consumer computer interaction. He was also the founder of Lycos, Inc., the Internet search engine, a public company with offices in Boston, New York, and Pittsburgh.

He was a principal investigator on the Informedia Digital Video Library project (one of the NSF/ARPA/NASA Digital Libraries awardees), and was a co-principal investigator on ARPA's TIPSTER data extraction project.

His Internet agent ``Julia'' has been a finalist in all four Loebner Prize competitions, a restricted form of the Turing test.


Wolfgang Wahlster

Director
German Artificial Intelligence Research Center Ltd. (DFKI GmbH)

Wolfgang Wahlster is a Professor of Artificial Intelligence in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Saarbruecken, Germany and the Director of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). He received his diploma and doctoral degree in computer science and computational linguistics from the University of Hamburg. Since 1975 he has been working in the field as a principal investigator in various intelligent user interface projects, including HAM-ANS, XTRA, VITRA, PHI, RAP and WIP, PPP and AiA. He has published more than 150 technical papers on man-machine communication.

His current research includes intelligent multimodal interfaces, user modeling, natural language scene description, personalized interface agents, speech translation and auto-adaptive web presentations. Since 1993 he is the Scientific Director of the VERBMOBIL project on spontaneous speech translation. Prof. Wahlster is on the editorial boards of various international journals and book series such as Artificial Intelligence, Applied Artificial Intelligence, User Modeling and User-adapted Interaction. He is an AAAI Fellow and a recipient of the Fritz Winter Award, one of the most prestigious awards for engineering sciences in Germany, for his research on cooperative user interfaces. In 1995 he received the ITEA (Information Technology European Award, the highest recognition in European Computer Science) of the European Academies of Engineering (Euro-Case) for his work on WIP, a plan-based multimodal presentation system. In 1998 he has been awarded the degree of Doctor Honoris Causa by the Institute of Technology at Linkoeping University, Sweden.

He serves as a Trustee of IJCAII and a member of the Executive Board of the AI section of the German Informatics Association (GI). Prof. Wahlster was the Conference Chair for IJCAI-93 in Chambery, the Chair of the Board of Trustees of IJCAII from 1991 - 1993, the ECAI-96 Programme Chair and the Programme Co-Chair of ACL/EACL-97.

He is currently the Chair of ECCAI, the European Coordinating Committee for Artificial Intelligence and the Vice-President of the Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL). He is the Co-Editor of the Readings in Intelligent User Interfaces.


Brian Williams

Associate Professor
M.I.T.

Brian C. Williams is an associate professor at MIT within the space systems and artificial intelligence laboratories. From 1995 to 1999 he formed the Autonomous System's Group at the NASA Ames Research Center, where he lead the development of highly deductive, model-based autonomous systems applied to spacecraft and rovers. Most notable is the remote agent autonomous control system, to be demonstrated on the Deep Space One space probe in May of 1999. From 1989 to 1994 Williams was at Xerox PARC, where he co-developed the GDE and Sherlock model-based diagnosis systems. He received his bachelor's in Electrical Engineering at MIT, continuing on to receive a Masters and Ph.D. in Computer Science in the areas of qualitative reasoning and automated invention.

Williams received a AAAI best paper award in 1988 for his work on hybrid qualitative/quantitative algebras, and jointly with Pandu Nayak in 1997 for their work on the Incremental Truth Maintenance System. He was guest editor for Artificial Intelligence in 1992, Chair for the AAAI Tutorial Forum in 1996 and 97 and is currently on the editorial boards of the journal of artificial intelligence research and AI Press. His research focuses on the creation of long-lived autonomous systems through model-based programming methods and highly deductive, reactive control kernels.



Last changed by Joerg P. Mueller, 3/3/99