CSE Alumni Achievement Awards

In Spring 2010, UW CSE introduced the Alumni Achievement Awards. Every year since, we have selected two outstanding alumni with exceptional records of achievement for recognition during our graduation celebration. The awards reaffirm to current and future CSE graduates that each contributes to a long, successful line of alumni whose impact reaches far and wide.

2016

Albert Greenberg

Albert Greenberg

Albert Greenberg has worked on the front lines of grand scale networking and cloud computing for more than two decades, first at Bell Labs/AT&T and then at Microsoft. Albert earned his Ph.D. at UW CSE in 1983 working on the development of efficient algorithms for multiple access channels alongside professors Richard Ladner and Martin Tompa. Before his arrival at UW CSE, he earned his Bachelor’s in Mathematics from Dartmouth College.

At Bell Labs/AT&T in New Jersey, Albert rose to division manager for network measurement engineering and research, and then to executive director and AT&T Fellow. He returned to Seattle in 2007, joining Microsoft as a Principal Researcher. For the past six years he has served as Distinguished Engineer and Director of Development for Microsoft’s Azure Networking, the company’s global cloud computing infrastructure platform that spans millions of servers around the globe and helps make Seattle the leader in cloud computing. Albert’s responsibilities encompass physical and virtual datacenter networking design and management, overseeing teams in Redmond, Mountain View, Hyderabad, Dublin, and Beijing.

The UW CSE Alumni Achievement Award is the latest in a string of honors for Albert. Earlier this year he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering – the profession’s highest honor. He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and has received the SIGCOMM Award for his lifetime contribution to the field of communications networks, the IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award, and multiple “Test of Time” awards for his research.

Read more about Albert's career and achievements here.


Stefan Savage

Stefan Savage

As a leader in the Systems & Networking and Computer & Network Security groups at the University of California San Diego, professor Stefan Savage has tackled everything from computer worms and online scams, to distributed attacks, insidious global consumer fraud networks, and automobile systems hacking. He is being honored twice this month for his outstanding research in network security and efforts to fight cyber crime: tonight he receives the UW CSE Alumni Achievement Award, and tomorrow, he collects the 2015 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences.

Stefan earned his Ph.D. from UW CSE in 2002 working with professors Brian Bershad and Tom Anderson. His route to computer science academia was unorthodox. Having begun his studies as an undergraduate at Carnegie Mellon University in physics and cognitive science, he wound up earning a degree in applied history instead. He then spent two years working in a computer science lab at CMU before following Bershad to Seattle, earning admission to UW CSE’s doctoral program a year later.

Stefan received job offers from MIT, Stanford, UC Berkeley, CMU, Cornell, UCSD, and several others. He joined UCSD for the cultural fit and turned his attention to battling cyber drug crime and shutting down counterfeit software sales by tracking the flow of money. Stefan also co-founded the Center for Automotive Embedded Systems Security with UW CSE professor Yoshi Kohno to draw attention to the security vulnerabilities of modern automobile systems, and established the Center for Evidence Based Security Research in collaboration with the International Computer Science Institute at Berkeley. He won the SIGOPS Mark Weiser Award in 2013, earning plaudits for his “uncanny ability to ask exactly the right question, propose exactly the right solution, and see that solution through to impact.

Read more about Stefan's career and achievements here.


2015

Kevin Jeffay

Kevin Jeffay

Kevin Jeffay received his Ph.D. from UW CSE in 1989 where he worked with Alan Shaw in the area of real-time operating systems. He has spent his entire 26-year post-CSE career at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he is now the Gillian T. Cell Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, and Chair of the Department of Computer Science -- the nation’s second-oldest computer science department.

Jeffay helped build the real-time systems program at UNC and, to attract students, established a multimedia group working on the then radical idea of processing audio-video in real time on a computer. Current high-profile research in the CS department includes a partnership with the physics department in developing the nanoManipulator, a virtual reality interface for scanned-probe microscopes. It can visualize an individual atom or clumps, and measures the mechanical forces required to bend a carbon nanotube. Another current project focuses on a free-space optical airborne communications network that would provide Internet service to homes across the U.S. through equipment installed on commercial aircraft.

An additional point of pride for those of us in UW CSE is that Kevin has always been deeply engaged with students. He’s won multiple awards for his teaching, and for many years he’s coached UNC’s team in the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest, including two trips to the World Finals.

Read more about Kevins's career and achievements here.


Tim Paterson

Tim Paterson

Tim Paterson’s email address is DosMan @ PatersonTech.com. In the most succinct possible way, that tells the story. Tim was among the first UW undergraduate alums in Computer Science. He received his Bachelors degree in 1978.

After graduating he joined a tiny company called Seattle Computer Products (SCP) as its only engineer. Tim designed a single-board computer based on Intel’s new 8086 processor, which SCP started shipping in 1979. The computer needed an operating system, so Tim designed a system called 86-DOS, which SCP started shipping in 1980. Microsoft came knocking around that time; Microsoft first licensed and then purchased 86-DOS from Seattle Computer Products. When the first IBM PC shipped in 1981, it was running that system -- re-branded by IBM as PC DOS. Tim worked on several additional releases of the system, both at Seattle Computer Products and at Microsoft.

His life has taken many interesting turns since that time -- from 8 years on the Visual Basic team to 5 years of competing in BattleBot tournaments.

Read more about Tim's career and achievements here.


2014

Jeff Dean

Jeff Dean

Jeff Dean received his PhD from UW CSE in 1996 where he worked with Craig Chambers on whole-program optimization techniques for object-oriented languages. He joined Google in mid-1999 and currently is a Google Senior Fellow in the Knowledge Group. His areas of interest include large–scale distributed systems, performance monitoring, compression techniques, information retrieval, application of machine learning to search and other related problems, microprocessor architecture, compiler optimizations, and development of new products that organize existing information in new and interesting ways. Products Jeff has developed for Google include AdSense, MapReduce, BigTable, and Google Translate.

Prior to joining Google, he was at DEC/Compaq's Western Research Laboratory, where he worked on profiling tools, microprocessor architecture, and information retrieval. Prior to graduate school, he worked at the World Health Organization's Global Programme on AIDS, developing software for statistical modeling and forecasting of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Read more about Jeff's career and achievements here.


Gail Murphy

Gail Murphy

Gail Murphy received her PhD from UW CSE in 1996 where she worked with David Notkin. My research interests are in software engineering with a particular interest in improving the productivity of knowledge workers, including software developers. She is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Associate Dean (Research & Graduate Studies) in the Faculty of Science at the University of British Columbia. I am also a co-founder and Chief Scientist at Tasktop Technologies Incorporated.

Gail has accrued a long list of honors since her UW graduate student days. Recent ones include the 2013 International Conference on Software Engineering award for “Most Influential Paper 10 Years Later,” the 2011 ACM SIGSOFT Retrospective Impact Paper Award, and a 2010 double header with the ACM Distinguished Scientist and ISCE Distinguished Paper awards. UW Engineering recognized her early career achievements with a 2008 Diamond Award.

Read more about Gail's career and achievements here.


2013

Anne Dinning

Anne Dinning

Anne Dinning received her Bachelors degree from UW CSE in 1984, where she did research with Professor Richard Ladner. After working in Seattle for a year, she moved to New York and received her PhD in computer science from the Courant Institute at NYU. She turned down a number of attractive faculty positions to become an early employee of D. E. Shaw, the hedge fund established by Columbia University computer science professor David Shaw. Today Anne is “first among equals” on the executive committee that oversees D. E. Shaw’s more than 1,000 employees, managing $26 billion in investment capital.

Read more about Anne's career and achievements here.


Edward Felten

Edward Felten

Edward Felten, a Caltech physics undergraduate, worked for several years as an analyst with Caltech’s Concurrent Computing Project before earning his PhD from UW CSE in 1993, where he worked with Ed Lazowska and John Zahorjan. He then joined the computer science faculty at Princeton University, transitioned to computer security as a research area, and developed a strong interest in public policy related to information technology. In addition to being a professor in Princeton’s Department of Computer Science, he is a Professor in Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs, and the Director of Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy; he recently spent two years in Washington DC on leave from Princeton as the first Chief Technologist of the Federal Trade Commission. Ed was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2011, and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2012.

Read more about Ed's career and achievements here.


2012

John K. Bennett

John K. Bennett

John K. Bennett (PhD '88) is an expert in the design, implementation, and evaluation of distributed systems. After teaching at Rice University, he joined the faculty at University of Colorado at Boulder in 2000, where he holds an endowed professorship in computer science and is a professor of electrical and computer engineering. He also served as associate dean of engineering and sciences, and now directs the ATLAS Institute, the Alliance for Technology, Learning, and Society - a campus-wide entrepreneurial catalyst and incubator for innovative interdisciplinary research, education, and creative work.

Read more about John's career and achievements here.


Wen-Hann Wang

Wen-Hann Wang

Wen-Hann Wang's (PhD '89) educational and career odysseys have crossed four continents. Our man of the world is also our man at Intel, where he is vice president of Intel Labs in Hillsboro, Oregon, and director of circuits and systems research. A new area of responsibility is looking at how to apply circuit technologies to solve biologic challenges. During more than 20 years at Intel, Wang’s assignments have included two postings to Shanghai and dozens of trips abroad to Russia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Closer to home travels include spring and fall visits to Seattle as Intel’s liaison to the UW.

Read more about Wen-Hann's career and achievements here.


2011

Anne Condon

Anne Condon

Anne Condon (PhD '87) is a computer science theoritician whose research has moved in a purposeful direction from complexity theory to DNA computing and algorithms for biology. After twelve years at the Computer Science faculty at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, she moved to the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, where she will become head of the Department of Computer Science in July. Besides research— currently focused on predicting secondary structures of nucleic acid polymers— Condon has a passion for mentoring emerging researchers, particularly undergraduate women. She is an ACM Fellow and the recipient of the 2010 A. Nico Habermann Award for service.

Read more about Anne's career and achievements here.


Jeremy Jaech

Jeremy Jaech

Jeremy Jaech (MS '80) has founded some of the best-known and most innovative software companies in the Pacific Northwest, including Aldus (pioneer in desktop publishing), Visio (technical drawing software now part of Microsoft Office), and Trumba (web-based event promotion). In 2008, Jeremy assumed the CEO role at Verdiem (power management software), where he successfully turned the company around financially. He is currently in residence on the fifth floor of the Paul G. Allen Center, exploring his next move.

Read more about Jeremy's career and achievements here.


2010

Greg Andrews

Greg Andrews (PhD '74) was one of the first PhD students in the program, working with Alan Shaw (now emeritus) on computer security and earning his degree in 1974. Over the course of a thirty-six-year career in academia, he has twice served as department chair at University of Arizona, authored three textbooks, and is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery.

Read more about Greg's career and achievements here.


Rob Short

Rob Short's (MS '87) remarkable professional journey began in his native Ireland, where he earned a two-year electronics degree from the Cork Institute of Technology, a trade school. Starting his career at Digital Computer Corporation (DEC) in Galway, he was invited to the US to work on the pioneering VAX families of minicomputers, first in Massachusetts and later in Washington State. Working with Hank Levy, he earned his MS degree in 1987 and joined Microsoft in 1988 to work on Windows NT (progenitor of Windows XP and Windows 7). By 2000 he was a corporate vice president. Rob retired in 2007 to devote himself to non-profit work, helping found See Your Impact, a pioneering philanthropic organization.

Read more about Rob's career and achievements here.