This page is for helping Allen School undergraduates better identify research opportunities. We solicited information from labs and individual professors regarding the best way to get involved with them.

You can navigate the lists by clicking on either Research or Individual labs to see more information about the labs and people who provided information, best of luck finding research!



Bespoke Silicon Group page

Who is your lab's main point of contact?  Michael Taylor < prof.taylor@gmail.com>

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? Create new kinds of hardware systems that have never been built before

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email resume and transcript to above address.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? 1) Strong C/C++ hacking skills OR 2) Strong 469/470 grades OR 3) Strong SystemVerilog HW design abilities OR 4) Experience hacking GCC codebase

Is there a challenge problem you give to prospective researchers? Usually; but customized for the student.

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? 15+ hr/week commitment; work independently and join the PhD and MS students as a responsible junior colleague


H2lab page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Hannah Hajishirzi < hannaneh@cs.washington.edu>

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? Artificial Intelligence, Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email above address

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? Good programming skills, some machine learning background

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? Working with a graduate student in the lab for the first project and working independently afterwards.


ICTD Lab page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Kurtis Heimerl <kheimerl@cs.washington.edu> and Richard Anderson <anderson@cs.washington.edu>

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? How to design and implement technology to solve pressing social issues, both domestically and internationally.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Explore ongoing projects and reach out to involved graduate students.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? Depends on the project but networking and HCI backgrounds are well supported.

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? Working closely with a graduate student on a small but important component of a project.


Make4all page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Kelly Mack <kmack3@cs.washington.edu>

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? We make technologies that support inclusion and accessibility. Our group applies technologies such as data science and 3D printing and other fabrication technologies to improving inclusion in and accessibility of our digital future.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Read this and fill out the form it links to: https://make4all.org/group/working-with-me/

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? Read https://make4all.org/group/working-with-me/

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like?  Read above link as well as https://make4all.org/working-in-our-group/values/


Makeability Lab page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Jon Froehlich <jonf@cs.washington.edu> or any grad student in lab

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? Our lab mission is to design, build, & study interactive tools and techniques to address pressing societal challenges.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Apply here: https://makeabilitylab.cs.washington.edu/faq/

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? The students who perform best in our group tend to be 'Makers' and self-starters unafraid of learning new technology and using it to build new, novel interactive experiences. Our research is heavily design/engineering but is also interdisciplinary. In particular, we encourage students in computer science, computer engineering, and electrical engineering to apply as well as those with art, design, and social science backgrounds.

Characteristics of highly successful ugrad researchers include: tenacity and persistence, the ability to work through ambiguity and solve problems independently, a sense of creativity and wonder, a willingness to take risks, a strong and dependable work ethic, good communication skills (both oral and written), and a passion for endless learning and working on a team to solve difficult, never-before-solved problems.

You also have to have time. Time to work, time to think, time to make mistakes and recover, and time to prototype, code, test, and iterate over and over again.

Is there a challenge problem you give to prospective researchers? My PhD students will likely give you a small challenge problem during your trial period with the lab

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? Please see our FAQ page: https://makeabilitylab.cs.washington.edu/faq/


MISL page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Luis Ceze, Karin Strauss, Jeff Nivala

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? The Molecular Information Systems Lab (MISL) at the University of Washington explores the intersection of information technology and molecular-level manipulation using in-silico and wet lab experiments. A partnership between UW Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Microsoft Research, MISL brings together faculty, students and research scientists with expertise in computer architecture, programming languages, synthetic biology, and biochemistry.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email faculty.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? Python, data manipulation (e.g., bioinformatics pipelines), possibly wet-lab experience.

Is there a challenge problem you give to prospective researchers? Read some of our papers and ask good questions.

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? Work closely with a graduate student or post-doc on a computing or molecular-biology related components of ongoing projects.


SAMPL page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Luis Ceze, Arvind Krishnamurthy and Zach Tatlock

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? SAMPL is an interdisciplinary machine learning research group exploring problems spanning multiple layers of the system stack including deep learning frameworks, specialized hardware for training and inference, new intermediate representations, differentiable programming, and various applications.  

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email faculty.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? Some experience with ML (e.g., pytorch, TF), appetite to learn!  

Is there a challenge problem you give to prospective researchers? Read one of our papers and ask good questions.

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? Work on our open source stack, run experiments on new fun hardware, etc.


Security and Privacy Research Lab page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Franzi Roesner <franzi@cs.washington.edu>, Yoshi Kohno <yoshi@cs.washington.edu>, and David Kohlbrenner <dkohlbre@cs.washington.edu>

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? Our lab aims to understand and improve computer security and privacy in existing and emerging technologies.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Please fill out this application form: http://goo.gl/forms/sD40kxIXM6

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? A variety of backgrounds might be appropriate, as our lab works on a broad range of topics using a variety of research methods, including building systems, identifying vulnerabilities, conducting measurements, and studying human end users. Having taken CSE 484 is a plus, but not a requirement. We look for a thoughtful interest in computer security and privacy, strong self-motivation, sufficient time to devote to research, and a good match with current or future projects and teams in the lab.

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? New undergraduate researchers typically join projects led by existing lab members (usually, PhD students) with weekly project meetings (including faculty advisors) as well as weekly lab meetings. Each project and experience will vary based on the interests and goals of the people involved. If scheduling allows, we also ask undergraduate researchers to join our CSE 590y security research seminar.


Sensor Systems Lab page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? Joshua Smith <jrs@cs.washington.edu>

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? We are trying to improve the connection between the physical and information worlds.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email Josh Smith. Please include a resume and unofficial transcript.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? Enthusiasm is important. Specific background depends on the project...there is not a hard and fast rule.

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? Undergrads usually work directly with a grad student or postdoc. We have projects in wireless communication, wireless power, and robotics. There are opportunities to apply machine learning in all of these domains.


UW Reality Lab page

Who is your lab's main point of contact? John Akers <jakers96@cs.washington.edu>

What is the lab's goal in research / questions you're trying to answer? Advancing virtual and augmented reality through computer vision, computer graphics, and interaction.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Fill out the following form to be added to the list of candidates: https://forms.gle/bNzjSqh5DXQYHkzy8

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before joining your lab? There are no specific requirements but students should take courses in computer graphics, computer vision, and machine learning. Gaining experience with AR/VR development tools and frameworks such as Unity, OpenCV, PyTorch, and Blender will also make students more prepared for projects in the Reality Lab.

What does being an undergrad researcher in your lab look like? The UW Reality Lab has two different types of roles for undergraduate students.

The first is much like traditional undergraduate research assistant positions where a student works closely with a graduate student on one of their research projects, which often includes responsibilities such as collecting data and generating data sets using cutting-edge algorithms.

The second role is through our new Incubator program where students are assembled into teams working on new projects exploring AR/VR technology that often supports a group from the greater UW community. In the Incubator program students will have the opportunity to work on the full project cycle, with each project culminating in some form of public release.



tom@cs.uw.edu

What does doing research with you look like? We try to pair undergraduates with a PhD mentor - generally to help with an ongoing implementation project. That helps everyone be successful, but it also limits the number of students we can work with at a time.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email Tom

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? It varies depending on the topic. My lab does research in hardware design (for that, you need Verilog), operating systems (451 or 452 or 444), networking (461), and sometimes distributed systems (452), and generally we need students to be able to work for a year - the projects tend to be substantial and implementation oriented. For software projects, at least one of the major systems implementation courses is needed (that is, 451 or 452 or 444 or 461). I have advised both undergraduate and 5th year masters projects, so if you won't complete the courses until senior year but you are staying for a 5th year, that is also an option.

Anything else you would like undergrads to know? For this academic year, we are looking for people who are interested in implementing network protocols in Verilog. We are open to possible projects in the areas of operating systems, file systems, and networking.


yejin@cs.uw.edu

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email Yejin with CV, (optional) transcript, and a short statement of what the student is interested in

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? Strong background on NLP or deep learning


hannaneh@cs.uw.edu

What does doing research with you look like? Working with a graduate student in my lab for the first project and working independently for next projects.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email Hanna. Then, they would interview with Hanna and/or my graduate students 

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? Good programming skills, some ML background


kevinl@cs.uw.edu

What does doing research with you look like? I advise individual or small-group research projects. We would start with a literature review, identify a problem space, and then explore research opportunities within or around that space. These projects would mostly be unfunded, but there's a lot of interesting work that can be done within these parameters.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email Kevin and/or schedule a meeting with him at kevinl.info/meet

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? Interest in computing education and familiarity with some of my research interests posted online at kevinl.info/research. Students should also consider taking the CS Education Research seminar, CSE 590E.


reinecke@cs.uw.edu

What does doing research with you look like? Undergraduate students usually get paired with a PhD student or postdoc that they closely work together over the course of a project. (Usually 6-12 months.) We meet at least once a week to discuss the research and next steps. The task undergraduates get involved in highly depends on their background, but can range from a literature review to data collection and annotation, to designing, conducting, and analyzing an experiment, or building a (often web-based) system.

How should undergrads apply for a position? By writing an email to Katharina with an unofficial transcript and a description of their interest in our lab.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? At the very minimum they should read 3-4 of my lab's papers and be interested in studying technology and how its design may have a differential effect on people from different demographic and geographic backgrounds.


adriana@cs.uw.edu

To do research with Adriana: Please contact her PhD students directly

What does doing research with you look like? Minimum of 15 hours/week. Students are directly advised my on of my PhD students/post-docs.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Please fill in this form: https://forms.gle/XpoXCwGxvKvPid2g6

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? Project dependent, see this document.


jrs@cs.uw.edu

What does doing research with you look like? I usually have undergrads supervised by a grad student or postdoc.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Please email Josh. Please include a resume and an unofficial transcript.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? There is no hard and fast rule.


nasmithg@cs.uw.edu

What does doing research with you look like? Undergraduates in my group are paired with a postdoc or PhD student mentor on a project of mutual interest. Our work is mostly experiment driven, but we spend a good bit of time trying to develop a clear mathematical understanding of the models we work with. Undergraduate researchers are encouraged to attend a weekly group meeting with me (no postdocs or grad students) to discuss projects and read papers together and are also welcome to join the larger Noah's ARK meeting (with everyone in the lab).

How should undergrads apply for a position? They should follow the instructions in the challenge problem prompt: https://homes.cs.washington.edu/~nasmith/temp/challenge.pdf

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? Students should have an interest in human language.


yuliangw@cs.uw.edu

What does doing research with you look like? We identify challenging problems at the forefront of computational biology, brainstorm novel ideas, and bring the idea to fruition in the form of a useful software package and publication. You will have lots of space to define and develop your own research agenda. We meet regularly, and schedules can be flexible to accommodate students' course load.

How should undergrads apply for a position? Email Yuliang with a brief description of your interest, experience, and relevant courses taken.

What kind of preparations would you expect students to have before doing research with you? Familiar with R or Python, and basic statistics. More information about my lab's research: https://yuliangwang.github.io